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2020/2021  BA-BHAAI1089U  The Past, Present and the Future of Innovation, Engaging Theory to Inform Practice

English Title
The Past, Present and the Future of Innovation, Engaging Theory to Inform Practice

Course information

Language English
Course ECTS 7.5 ECTS
Type Elective
Level Bachelor
Duration Summer
Start time of the course Summer
Timetable Course schedule will be posted at calendar.cbs.dk
Max. participants 120
Study board
Study Board for BSc in Economics and Business Administration
Course coordinator
  • Sudhanshu Rai - Department of Management, Society and Communication (MSC)
For academic questions related to the course, please contact instructor Sudhanshu Rai at sr.msc@cbs.dk
Other academic questions: contact Sven Bislev at sb.msc@cbs.dk
Main academic disciplines
  • Innovation
Teaching methods
  • Online teaching
Last updated on 21/01/2021

Relevant links

Learning objectives
At the end of the course and reflected in the written exam report the student should be able to;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of innovation theory
  • Show an appreciation of the impact of context on innovation
  • Synthesize theory with practice and demonstrate how to deploy innovation
  • Critically reflect about how to integrate theoretical insights to limitations, and its efficacy for innovations in the future.
Course prerequisites
Students wanting to take this elective should have basic knowledge of business.

In addition; the students should also bring to class a box of discarded items from their home to be used in class. This box and its items are important for the progression of the class. It is important to note that students should keep the items small, easy to work with, easy to disassemble into components for reconstruction purposes. This box of discarded domestic items will be used as resource material for understanding innovation and its practice.

Each student will bring this box of discarded objects to the first class.
Students wanting to take this elective should have basic knowledge of business.

In addition; the students should also bring to class a box of discarded items from their home to be used in class. This box and its items are important for the progression of the class. It is important to note that students should keep the items small, easy to work with, easy to disassemble into components for reconstruction purposes. This box of discarded domestic items will be used as resource material for understanding innovation and its practice.

Each student will bring this box of discarded objects to the first class.
Examination
The Past, Present and the Future of Innovation, Engaging Theory to Inform Practice:
Exam ECTS 7.5
Examination form Home assignment - written product
Individual or group exam Individual exam
Size of written product Max. 15 pages
Assignment type Essay
Duration Written product to be submitted on specified date and time.
Grading scale 7-point grading scale
Examiner(s) One internal examiner
Exam period Summer and Summer, Ordinary exam: Home Assignment: 22 June-30 July 2021. Please note that exam will start on the first teaching day and will run in parallel with the course.
Retake exam: 72-hour home assignment: 27 – 30 September 2021 – for all ISUP courses simultaneously
3rd attempt (2nd retake) exam: 72-hour home assignment: 22 – 25 November 2021 – for all ISUP courses simultaneously
3rd attempt (2nd retake) exam: 72-hour home assignment: 22 – 25 November 2021 – for all ISUP courses simultaneously
Make-up exam/re-exam
Same examination form as the ordinary exam
Retake exam: 72-hour home assignment, max. 10 pages, new exam question
Exam form for 3rd attempt (2nd retake): 72-hour home assignment, max. 10 pages, new exam question
Description of the exam procedure

The purpose of the examination is to determine the level of understanding the student has acquired from the literature, class discussions and feedback sessions, and how they critically reflect and integrate these sets of knowledge and experience into a coherent written product, which illustrates the learning objectives. This report is a reflective statement of how the students have learnt, what inspired the students during the lecture and how have they made sense of that inspiration in the context of their class and group work. The final product (report) will demonstrate that the individual has indeed critically reflected showed understanding of the prescribed readings and is able to synthesis different aspects of experience in a coherent reflective innovative journey, where the learning from the lectures get a critical expression of the state of the art of innovation today.

Course content, structure and pedagogical approach

The focus of this course is to expose the student to the dynamic nature of innovation as it has been theorized in the past, its present application and how it might evolve in the future within the backdrop of a fast digitalizing ecosystem. Focus during these lectures will be on how innovation has evolved as a primary idea of our time. What impact innovation theorizing has on the current industrial ecosystem and its impact on our lives. Furthermore, we will explore the direction of innovation thinking, how it has integrated several ideas from other fields. What is the implication of such integration to current innovation thinking and for the future?

 

Preliminary assignment: Before students start participating in classroom activities. It is recommended that the students read the following book for familiarization of the topic and general understanding of the consequence of innovation for prosperity and human wellbeing. Reading this book is mandatory as a preliminary activity before class commences. Students write a two page summary of the book and come to the first class with this summery. Initial discussion in the class will take note of the students understanding of innovation derived from the book.

Book title

Acemoglu, D., & Robinson, J. (2013). Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. Retrieved December 9, 2015, from http://www.amazon.com/Why-Nations-Fail-Origins-Prosperity/dp/0307719227

 

We will start from current innovation ideas, addressing the diversity of innovation thought and proposed models. We will then highlight our current context and explore how innovation research deals with the present. Finally we will critically reflect about the future and the implication of innovation theorizing on understanding the future shape of opportunity creation and innovation. This course is to provide the students an experience of innovation during classroom activities while using the literature as a scaffold to support the experience of the student’s innovative initiative during the unfolding of the course.

 

The course aims at developing integrational skills, primarily integrating classroom experience with literature, Moe specifically; the articles, (those articles that inspired the student most and why).

Reflections from the workshops (the scrum report is a document prepared by students about each class, how it flowed, the issues discussed, the ideas missed and additional literature from the web which could be useful for the topic).

The personal diary (where the students records his or her personal reflections about the class, what they learnt, what they are unclear about and need feedback from the resource person or the group on and questions that they would like addressed in feedback sessions during the next class).

Finally their experiences from the group itself, (how the groups innovative idea evolved, what were the challenges and how did the group use the literature to help address the innovative journey). :

 

All students will be required to build something innovative during class hours in groups while they use theories to understand and critically evaluate the relevance of literature in the context of practice.

 

The course themes are as follows;

 

•           Where do innovation theories come from, an historical understanding of innovation.

•           Understanding the nature of theoretical evolution of innovation thinking.  

•           The economics of innovation

•           The impact of innovation on modernity

•           The process of innovation

•           What are business models, how do they support innovation.

Types of innovation, co-creation, frugal innovation etc in emerging ½

Economies

•           Challenges and obstacles

•           The business of innovation and opportunities

•           Synchronous and a-synchronous innovation

•           Innovation policies and their impact

•           Innovative firms, best practices, success stories and what can we learn

•           Entrepreneurial leadership and innovative potential, connecting the dots.

•           Focusing on the idea and building a business; exploring entrepreneurial capacity from the innovation.

•           A critical evaluation of innovation in flux, what to expect from the future as innovation thinking evolves.

Description of the teaching methods
This year all courses are taught digitally over the Internet. Instructors will apply direct/live teaching through a link (like Skype, Team, Zoom). In some courses, pre-recorded material will also be used.
Feedback during the teaching period
This class is designed to be interactive; therefore students must be committed to working in groups and asking questions at every stage of their innovative journey. Giving feedback and receiving feedback is an important part of the course design therefore students must be prepared to seek and receive feedback from the resource person.
Student workload
Preliminary assignment 20 hours
Classroom attendance 33 hours
Preparation 126 hours
Feedback activity 7 hours
Examination 20 hours
Further Information

Preliminary Assignment: To help students get maximum value from ISUP courses, instructors provide a reading or a small number of readings or video clips to be read or viewed before the start of classes with a related task scheduled for class 1 in order to 'jump-start' the learning process.

 

Course timetable is/will be available on https://www.cbs.dk/uddannelse/international-summer-university-programme-isup/courses-and-exams

 

We reserve the right to cancel the course if we do not get enough applications. This will be communicated on https://www.cbs.dk/uddannelse/international-summer-university-programme-isup/courses-and-exams in March 2021.

Expected literature

Lecture 1: Innovation, a reflective understanding of the scope.

 

Bonchek, Mark (2016) How to Create an Exponential Mindset. Business Models. Harvard Business Review. July 27,

 

Hobday, M. (2005). Firm-level innovation Models: Perspectives on Research in Developed and Developing Countries. Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, 17 (2), pp. 121-146.

 

Lecture 2; Innovation and its context, A Macro view

 

Cohen, W. M. & Levinthal, D. A. (1990): "Absorptive Capacity: A new Perspective on Learning and Innovation". Administrative Science Quarterly, Volume 35, Issue 1 pg. 128-152.

 

March, J. G. (1991): "Exploration and Exploitation in Organizational Learning". Organization Science 2, Special 71-87.

 

 Huff, T. E. (1973). Theoretical Innovation in Science: The Case of William F. Ogburn. American Journal of Sociology, 79, pp. 261–277.

 

Lecture 3 the economics of innovation

 

Barney, J. (1991). Firm Resources and Sustained Competitive Advantage. Journal of Management, 17 (1), pp. 99-120.

 

 Beise, M. (2004). Lead Markets: Country-specific Success Factors of the Global Diffusion of Innovations. Research Policy, 33 (6/7), pp. 997-1018

 

Ruttan, V. W. (1959). Usher and Schumpeter on Invention, Innovation, and Technological Change. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 73, pp. 596-606.

 

 Lecture 4 Innovation models.

 

Henderson, Rebecca M., and Kim B. Clark. 1990. “Architectural Innovation: The Reconfiguration of Existing Product Technologies and the Failure of Established Firms.” Administrative Science Quarterly 35(1):9

 

Castellacci, F. (2008). Technological Paradigms, Regimes and Trajectories: Manufacturing and Service Industries in a New Taxonomy of Sectoral Patterns of Innovation. Research Policy, 37, pp. 978-994

 

Lecture 5 Path Dependency: Is it a barrier  to innovation?

 

Djelic, M-L. and Quack, S. (2007), “Overcoming path dependency: path generation in open systems”, Theory and Society, Vol. 36, pp. 161-86.

 

Goldstone, J. (19 98a), “Initial conditions, general laws, path-dependence, and explanation in historical sociology”, American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 104, pp. 829-45

 

Lecture 6 Disruptive innovations: How disruptive, is disruptive innovation.

 

Christensen, C. M. (2006). The ongoing process of building a theory of disruption. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 23(1), 39–55. http:/​​/​​doi.org/​​10.1111/​​j.1540-5885.2005.00180.x

 

 Chase, Robin. (2016) We need to expand the definition of disruptive innovation. Disruptive Innovation. Harvard Business Review. January,.

 

Lecture 7 Business model innovations and creative destruction

 

Casadesus-Masanell, Ramon and Tarziján. Jorge. (2012) When One Business Model Isn’t Enough. Harvard Business Review. Business Models. January–February  Issue

 

Chesbrough, Henry. (2010) Business Model Innovation: Opportunities and barriers. Long Range Planning 43  354-363.

 

Magretta, Joan. (2002) Why Business Models matter. Financial Management. Harvard Business Review,.

 

Lecture 8 Open innovation and co-creation, Innovation as a living evolving idea

 

Chesbrough, H. (2006). Open Innovation: A New Paradigm for Understanding Industrial Innovation. Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm, 1–12. http:/​​/​​doi.org/​​citeulike-article-id:5207447

 

Leavy, B. (2012). Collaborative innovation as the new imperative - design thinking, value co-creation and the power of “pull”. STRATEGY & LEADERSHIP, 40(2), 25-34

 

Lecture 9 Low cost, high quality, high impact innovation

 

Govindarajan, V., & Ramamurti, R. (2011). Reverse Innovation, Emerging Markets, and Global Strategy. Global Strategy Journal, 1(3-4), pp. 191-205.

 

Sehgal V., Dehoff K., & Panneer G. (2010). The Importance of Frugal Engineering. Strategy + Business, 59, pp. 1-5.

 

 Lecture 10 Innovative firms, best practices, success stories and what can we learn for the future.

Lindegaard, S. (2009). Open Innovation Versus User-driven Innovation: Lego and Toyota cases. Retrieved February 12, 2014 from the site: http:/​​/​​www.15inno.com/​​2009/​​01/​​26/​​open-innovation-versus-user-driven-innovation-lego-and-toyota-cases/​​.

 

 Mukherji, S. (2011). SELCO: Solar Lightning for the Poor. – SELCO: Solar Ligthning for The Poor. UNDP Case Study, Retrieved from: http:/​​/​​www.growinginclusivemarkets.org/​​media/​​cases/​​India_SELCO_2011.pdf  

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Last updated on 21/01/2021